Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory

Lectureships and Other Academic Service

 

Dr. Tom Stohlgren: Senior Scientist and Affiliate Faculty at Colorado State University  

I have been a Senior Scientist at Natural Resource Ecology Lab (since 1992) and Affiliate Faculty (since 1993) in Graduate Degree Program in Ecology, and Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Watershed Stewardship) at Colorado State University.  As Senior Scientist, I lead and participate in various research projects (funded by NSF, agencies, and others), has served on the NREL Executive Committee, Awards Committee, etc., and volunteers on faculty searches and university activities. I have received outstanding student evaluations for teaching. I also help judge the Front Range Student Ecology Symposium every year. As Affiliate Faculty, I teach one to two graduate-level classes per year, provide 6 to 8 guest lectures/year in classes in several Departments, co-advise several Ph.D. and Masters students, and serve on dozens of graduate student committees.

 University Courses Taught:

SECTION

SEMINAR TITLE

OFFERED

INSTRUCTOR(S)

EY683

Research Proposal Writing

Spring 2014

Tom Stohlgren

EY592

Technical Writing

Spring 2013

Dan Binkley and Tom Stohlgren

EY592

Philosophy of Science

Fall 2012

Dan Binkley and Tom Stohlgren

EY592

 

Technical Writing

Spring 2012

Dan Binkley and Tom Stohlgren

EY592

006

Judicious Sentencing (Technical Writing)

Spring 2011

Dan Binkley and Tom Stohlgren

EY592

001

The Fringe of Knowledge: Science at the Frontiers of Ecology

Fall 2010

Dan Binkley &
Tom Stohlgren

EY592

004

Judicious Sentencing

Fall 2008

Dan Binkley and Tom Stohlgren

EY592

001

Exploring Ecological Data Sets

Fall 2007

Tom Stohlgren

Lectures:

 Each year, I present about 6 to 8 other “guest lectures” in a variety of undergraduate and graduate classes in the natural science classes in various Departments including Forest, Rangeland and Watershed Stewardship, and Bio-Agriculture and Pest Management. Recent examples include: Ecology 590 “Foundations in Ecology”; Range Science 420 and BI 528 Invasive Plants and Weeds: Ecosystems to Molecules.

Spring 2000-2007 (each year):  EY571 Advanced Topics in Ecology/Distinguished Ecologists Lecture Series and Discussion, which included selecting weekly readings for 20 to 25 students and holding two, hour-long discussions per week for 20 graduate students. I have given special seminars on Invasion Ecology, Species Distribution Modeling, Applied Statistics for Ecological Research, and Measuring Plant Diversity

 graduate level seminar on the “Philosophy of Science,” co-taught with Professor Dan Binkley. 

Graduate Student Advising:

I continue to serve as major co-advisor to one to three Ph.D. students per year and one to three Masters Degree students per year. I am currently advising Ted Manahan (MS), Sara Simonson (PhD), Anthony Vorster (MS), and David Barnett (PhD). I also serve on a dozen or more graduate committees.

Theses and Dissertations Supervised:

Prettypaint-Small, V. 2013. “Linking Culture, Ecology and Policy: The Invasion of Russian-Olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia L.) on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana, USA; Department of Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management, ColoradoStateUniversity, Ph.D. Spring 2013)

Newman, G. 2010. Designing and evaluating participatory cyber-infrastructure systems for multi-scale citizen science. Ph.D. Dissertation. Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Watershed Stewardship, ColoradoState University. 137 pgs.

York, Patricia. 2010. A Habitat Overlap Analysis derived from Maxent for Tamarisk and the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher. MS Thesis. Department of Forest Rangeland and Watershed Stewardship, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. 38pp.

Young, N. 2010. Regional data refine local abundance models: modeling plant species abundance distributions on the central plains. M.S. Thesis. Department of Forest, Rangeland and Watershed Stewardship, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. 43pp.

Holcombe, T. 2009. Early detection and rapid assessment of invasive organisms under global climate change.  Ph.D. Dissertation. Graduate Degree Program in Ecology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. 112pp. (USGS SCEP student, now USGS Ecologist)

Evangelista, P. 2009. Mapping Tamarix: New techniques for field measurements, spatial modeling and remote sensing. Ph.D. Dissertation. Department of Forest Rangeland and Watershed Stewardship, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. 108pp.

Kumar, S. 2007. Effects of spatial heterogeneity on native and nonnative plant and butterfly species richness in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA. Ph.D. Dissertation. Department of Forest Rangeland and Watershed Stewardship, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. 160pp.

Graham, J.J. 2006. A Global Organism Detection and Monitoring system for non-native species. Ph.D. Dissertation. Department of Forest Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. 130pp.

Davern, T. 2006. A Predictive Model: Tamarisk Habitat In California and Colorado. M.S. Thesis.  Department of Forestry.  Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO.  103 pp.

Freeman, J. 2006. Rapid Response to Post-fire Plant Invasion. M.S. Thesis. Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Watershed Stewardship. Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. 29 pp.

Bergquist, E. 2005. Invasive Species and Coal Bed Methane Development in the PowderRiver Basin, Wyoming. M.S. Thesis. Graduate Degree Program in Ecology. Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. 33 pp.

Crosier, C.S. 2004. Synergistic methods to generate predictive models at large spatial extents and fine resolution.  PhD Dissertation. Graduate Degree Program in Ecology. Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. 119 pp.

Alley, N. W., Stohlgren, T. J., Evangelista, P. H., Iterative Model Development for Natural Resource Managers, A Case Example at Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah. Geographic Information Sciences, Vol. 10, No.1, pp. 1-9, June 2004

Evangelista, P. 2004. Vegetation Response to fire and post-burn seeding treatments in juniper woodlands of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah. M.S. Thesis. Department of Forest Sciences. Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. 64 pp.

Waters, M.A.2003. Species Richness, Vegetation Cover, and Disturbance Relationships in an Arid Ecosystem. MS Thesis. Department of Natural Resources Graduate Degree Program in Ecology. Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. 56 p.

Chong, G.W. 2002. Predicting non-native plant invasions in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. Ph.D. Dissertation.

Kaye, M. 2002.  Aspen (Populus tremuloides) population dynamics in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. Ph.D. Dissertation.

Barnett, D. 2002. A nested-intensity sampling design for plant diversity in Colorado. Masters Thesis.

Suzuki, K. 1998. Aspen regeneration in RockyMountainNational Park and Roosevelt National Forest, Colorado.  Masters Thesis.

Regan, C. 1997. Old growth stand characteristics in a Southwestern Forest" Department of Forest Science, Ph.D. Dissertation.

Other Academic Service:

Since 1995, I have served or currently serve on more than a dozen additional graduate committees each year which involved reviewing student proposals, administering qualifying exams, providing sampling design and statistical advice, reviewing thesis and dissertation chapters, and participating in degree defenses and graduation ceremonies. I have assisted in training several international graduate students including Mingyang Li (People’s Republic of China (Professsor), Diana Garcia (Ph.D. student from Venezuela), Gustavo Martinez-Turanzas (Mexico), Ingolf Kuehn (Germany), Kuni Suzuki and Yasuhiro Onami (Japan), Sunil Kumar (India), and Doi Buy (Viet Nam).  I routinely help students with data analysis and sampling design questions and maintain an "open-door" policy every day for students.